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UPDATES: A review at the 

 

"The careful, documented drumbeat of chapters shocks, numbs and then frightens the reader with case after case of tens of thousands of American citizens who have been blown up, poisoned, shot, burned, radiated, assassinated and used as human lab rats — killed through negligence, through hubris, through agency-building and often as publicity events designed to increase government funding."

Plus, a description of the author's Waco investigation at 

"ATF claimed a surprise attack was necessary because Koresh almost never came out of his home. Six years later, thanks to FOIA hounding by lawyer David Hardy, the ATF finally disclosed a memo revealing that, nine days before the raid, two undercover ATF agents (recognized as such by Koresh) knocked on the door of the Davidian residence and invited Koresh to go shooting. Koresh, two other Davidians, and the two agents had a fine time shooting AR-15s and Sig-Sauer semiautomatic pistols. But easily arresting Koresh that day would have preempted the biggest raid in ATF history."

Can government employees kill Americans by negligence, incompetence, or even intent, and escape all consequences? The answer is too often yes. A former agency attorney explains how and why, and what we must do to fix a deeply flawed legal system.

The story begins with the Texas City disaster of 1947, where the government (needing fertilizer for the Marshall Plan) decided that a certain high explosive would make good fertilizer, produced it under dangerous conditions, and shipped it to the port of Texas City. Four million pounds of it detonated. 600 Americans died, and the town was devastated.

The resulting lawsuit went to the Supreme Court -- which ruled that the government could not be sued, no matter how shocking its negligence had been. The ruling remains law to this day. In case after case, federal agencies have escaped liability for their deadly errors. In fact, the legal regime actually rewards officials for dangerous behavior, and penalizes them if they try to protect your safety!

Texas City. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Ruby Ridge. Waco. Operation Fast and Furious. The VA hospital scandal. 

It doesn't have to be this way. In I'm From the Government, a former GS-14 agency attorney explains not only what is wrong, but how we can fix it, and make government accountable to citizens whom it injures.